Hundreds of DHS Seniors Celebrate College Decisions

Filed under: Duncanville ISD,Schools |

For graduating seniors and their families, it is a special day when a student announces his or her college choice. Making that announcement has become a rite of passage for seniors, along with prom, senior trips and graduation. This year, Duncanville High School staff helped more than 240 seniors formalize their announcement at the first ever DHS College Decision Day.

Students were invited to decorate tables with their college or military colors Tuesday evening. Like athletes who celebrate on their signing days, students dressed in their new schools’ spirit wear and loaded their tables with balloons and other memorabilia.

Jessica Yanes plans to study nursing at Texas State University. She shared the table decorated in maroon and white with classmate Taya Boatwright, who will also attend Texas State next year to study agriculture and business finance.

“This [table] shows where I’m going and what I am doing,” Taya said.
College Decision Day Proud parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles took advantage of the celebration to photograph the students as they take the next step in their education journey. The decisions included 58 colleges or universities and four branches of the military.

DHS counselors Michael Junior and Karina Martinez organized College Decision Day with the help of high school staff and administrators. The two counselors have been walking through the application, scholarship and testing process with the graduating seniors and wanted the sendoff to include useful gifts for school.

DHS staff collected enough supplies to fill more than 60 college care packages that were given away. The gifts included bedding, school supplies, dry erase boards, organizers, gift cards and several printers. The top prize of the night was a $600 scholarship.

Duncanville High School Executive Principal Tia Simmons extended a special thanks to parents for supporting their students. Ms. Simmons also recognized the teachers, extended families and others, because “it really does take a village.”